Tag: healthyeating

Vegan Alternatives for Butter

Vegan Alternatives for Butter

Coconut oil Unlike the oils mentioned above, coconut oil is solid at room temperature and has a texture much closer to butter than other cooking oils. This means it’s great for replacing butter in most of your baking. A generally good rule of thumb is to […]

Is Honey Vegan friendly?

Is Honey Vegan friendly?

Why most vegans don’t eat honey Honey is a somewhat controversial food among vegans. Unlike overt animal foods like meat, eggs, and dairy, foods from insects aren’t always grouped into the vegan category. In fact, some vegans who eat an otherwise entirely plant-based diet may […]

THE BEST VEGAN MEAT COMPANY/ IMPOSSIBLE FOODS

THE BEST VEGAN MEAT COMPANY/ IMPOSSIBLE FOODS

IMPOSSIBLE FOODS

What is their mission?

TO SAVE MEAT. AND EARTH.

„We’ve been eating meat since we lived in caves. And today, some of our most magical moments together happen around meat: Weekend barbecues. Midnight fast-food runs. Taco Tuesdays. Hot dogs at the ballpark. Those moments are special, and we never want them to end. But using animals to make meat is a prehistoric and destructive technology. Animal agriculture occupies almost half the land on earth, consumes a quarter of our freshwater and destroys our ecosystems. So we’re doing something about it: we’re making meat using plants, so that we never have to use animals again. That way, we can eat all the meat we want, for as long as we want. And save the best planet in the known universe.“

 

FROM PLANTS TO MEAT

We started with a question: What if we could make meat better? Our approach: understand exactly what people love about meat, dairy, and fish, and then explore the plant world for specific ingredients that recreate those experiences — the flavor, the texture, the juicy sizzle. The result? Meat from plants. Good for people, and the planet.

TINY MOLECULE. BIG FLAVOR.

Heme is what makes meat taste like meat. It’s an essential molecule found in every living plant and animal — most abundantly in animals — and something we’ve been eating and craving since the dawn of humanity. Here at Impossible Foods, our plant-based heme is made via fermentation of genetically engineered yeast, and safety-verified by America’s top food-safety experts and peer-reviewed academic journals. Watch more below.

HOW IT’S MADE

We started by using the heme-containing protein from the roots of soy plants. It’s called soy leghemoglobin. We took the DNA from soy plants and inserted it into a genetically engineered yeast. And we ferment this yeast—very similar to the way Belgian beer is made. But instead of producing alcohol, our yeast multiply and produce a lot of heme.

 

 

PLANT POWER/ BEST VEGAN RIBZ

PLANT POWER/ BEST VEGAN RIBZ

Introducing Veggie Ribz.. Veggie Ribz – Sweet & Smoky BBQ Alright we know what you’re thinking. Vegan ribz?! Ludicrous – what smoke and mirrors have they used to create these? Well actually they’re made with our tempeh – cultured soya beans – and our sweet […]

The EASIEST Crispy Tofu Recipe (Only 3 Ingredients!)

The EASIEST Crispy Tofu Recipe (Only 3 Ingredients!)

Credit to From my bowl Ingredients 1 14 oz. block Extra Firm Tofu 1 tbsp Reduced-Sodium Tamari 2 tbsp Nutritional Yeast, plus more to taste Instructions First, preheat the oven to 425F. Drain the liquid from the Tofu and “press” the extra liquid out by wrapping it […]

Can’t Believe It’s Not Meat, New Hyde Park Vegan Spot, Has A Plant-Based Version Of Chicken And Mild Sauce

Can’t Believe It’s Not Meat, New Hyde Park Vegan Spot, Has A Plant-Based Version Of Chicken And Mild Sauce

HYDE PARK — Can’t Believe It’s Not Meat, a vegan and vegetarian spot specializing in plant-based comfort food, opened in Hyde Park this weekend.

The restaurant, at 1368-½ E. 53rd St. in Hyde Park, aims to please serious vegans and meat-eaters alike, with burgers, hot dogs and Philly cheesesteaks made with soy and other plant-based proteins.

Owned by his vegetarian sister Laricia Chandler, restaurateur Rico Nance said the focus on American staples could help locals realize that a plant-based diet isn’t so scary.

“We wanted to encourage transitioning into healthy eating by creating healthier versions of your favorite comfort foods and providing knowledge about plant-based alternatives,” Nance said.

A plant-based “chicken” leg at I Can’t Believe It’s Not Meat in Hyde Park.

Other veggiefied offerings include “chicken” and waffles, lasagna, and a vegan chicken leg with mild sauce, which may remind diners of a certain popular local chain.

The restaurant will also offer shakes, smoothies and homemade lemonade. Prices range from $7-$16.

The restaurant will be open 11 a.m.-9 p.m. Sunday through Thursday, noon-6 p.m. on Fridays with special Saturday hours 6 p.m.-midnight in observation of the Sabbath.

Nance owns Litehouse Whole Food Grill, Mikkey’s Grill and Soul Shack, which opened last month. Chandler owns Epitome Boutique, 216 W. 31st Street.

*Editor’s note: An earlier version of this article incorrectly stated that the restaurant was owned by Rico Nance. Nance’s sister Laricia Chandler is the actual owner of Can’t Believe It’s Not Meat.

The “Who Betta” Double Burger. Photo/Instagram: Cantbelieveitsnotmeatinc

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Plant-based gastronomy? Spanish start-up seeks to revolutionize food system with sustainable protein sources

Plant-based gastronomy? Spanish start-up seeks to revolutionize food system with sustainable protein sources

According to Food Ingridients First on 05 Apr 2019 — Spanish-based start-up Foods for Tomorrow is seeking to “revolutionize the food system through plant-based gastronomy.” Currently, the company’s flagship brand Heura, a plant-based protein very similar to chicken in terms of flavor and texture, is […]